Catheter-related infection

Innovations

State-Mandated Tracking and Public Reporting Reduce Incidence and Costs of Common Hospital-Acquired Infections 07/23/12

As required by law, hospitals in New York track and report information on select hospital-acquired infections to the State Department of Health, which publicly releases hospital-specific performance data and supports hospitals with quality improvement initiatives; the program has reduced infection rates and generated substantial cost savings.

Protocols, Task Specialization, and Case Reviews Virtually Eliminate Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit 07/09/11

A comprehensive set of protocols and practices virtually eliminates catheter-related bloodstream infections in the neonatal intensive care unit, generating estimated annual savings of $750,000 to $1,000,000.

Improvement Projects Led by Unit-Based Teams of Nurse, Physician, and Quality Leaders Reduce Infections, Lower Costs, Improve Patient Satisfaction, and Nurse–Physician Communication 12/04/09

Unit-based teams of physicians, nurses, and quality leaders develop and implement unit-specific initiatives designed to improve quality and safety, leading to reductions in infections and pressure ulcers, increased adherence to medication reconciliation standards, more reporting of errors and near-misses, higher patient satisfaction, and better overall nurse/physician communication and teamwork.

Collaborative Supports Hospitals in Sharing and Implementing Best Practices, Leading to 33-Percent Decline in Urinary Tract Infections 10/27/09

A 1-year collaborative program; in which 21 Pennsylvania hospitals set target goals for urinary tract infection prevention, developed strategies to meet these goals, and shared best practices, tools, and resources; led to a 32-percent decline in hospital-acquired urinary tract infections.

Intensive Care Units Participating in Hospital Collaborative Implement Multiple Improvement Strategies, Leading to Fewer Deaths and Lower Costs 09/29/09

As part of a hospital collaborative, intensive care units implemented a multifaceted safety program that reduced infections and hospital days, saved lives, and lowered health care costs.

Round-the-Clock Intensivists Eliminate Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia, Central Line Infections, and Pressure Ulcers in Intensive Care Unit 08/04/09

Intensivists guide care around the clock in two medical–surgical intensive care units, leading to lower length of stay and the near elimination of ventilator-associated pneumonia, hospital-acquired pressure ulcers, and central line infections.

System-Wide Quality Improvement Infrastructure Facilitates Adoption of Best Practices and Leads to Better Outcomes 05/11/09

New health system–wide infrastructure facilitates better adherence to recommended practices, lower mortality, and the virtual elimination of code blues.

Evidence-Based Bundle Increases Adherence to Recommended Practices, Leading to Fewer Central Line Infections and Lower Costs 12/23/08

Implementation of an evidence-based bundle of interventions led to a 75 percent reduction in central line infections in four intensive care units, yielding annual cost avoidance of approximately $1 million.

Nurse-Enforced Protocols and Associated Tools Significantly Reduce Catheter-Related Infections in the Intensive Care Unit 09/30/08

St. John Hospital and Medical Center developed and implemented nurse-enforced protocols and associated tools, leading to a significant reduction in the incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections.

Daily, Multidisciplinary Rounds and Evidence-Based Best Practices Decrease Nosocomial Infections and Costs in the Intensive Care Unit 02/11/08

The combination of multidisciplinary, physician-led rounds and a set of evidence-based best practices (known as “bundles”) decreased nosocomial infection rates and costs in the intensive care unit.

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